Post NaNoWriMo Editing Sale!

Please note: this sale has ended!


Hello to all you NaNoWriMo participants and winners! I hope that you achieved your goal for the month… whether that was to churn out 50,000 words of Nobel Laureate-worthy prose or just to get back in the swing of creative writing. Me? I didn’t get the word count, but I did get some work done on my work-in-progress, so go me!

Now that we’re all done celebrating our writerly prowess and awake again after our turkey comas, it’s time to… keep writing more! And making sure it’s the best it can be.

I promised a sale on editing services in honor of NaNo (you don’t have to be a winner), so here it is: 25% off of ALL services, big and small. Check my rates here. For work that I don’t charge a per-word rate for, we’ll go through a friendly negotiation and then take 25% off of that.

That’s not all. If you want to sample my services and see what it’s like to work with me in the easiest way, I’ve got deal the for you. Send me up to 5,000 words, and I’ll give it an edit and brief commentary for $35 flat. Simple! (In case you were wondering, that’s $0.007/word!)

“You’re crazy!!” you are probably saying. Nope. Just excited to see what everyone is working on. So contact me today so we can start talking about making your masterpiece even better. It’s going to be fun.

(Offer ends January 31, 2014. Resolve to take advantage of this deal before it’s gone! (See what I did there?!) And again – you don’t have to have had anything to do with NaNoWriMo this year to take advantage of this offer.)

NaNoWriMo: Halfway home. Stuck yet??

Hi, everybody! Sorry I dropped off the map. Between NaNo and the nice little boost of editing and non-profit work you’ve been sending my way (many thanks to you all!), I’ve been busy. I suppose that as soon as I committed to NaNo and started running the sale on non-profit consulting, that work would ensue… but I have room for more! Please contact me today to get some great deals on editing. I am super-fun to work with, if I do say so myself. And as I recall, I promised you all a NaNo editing special. That’s still coming, I just needed to put it off a bit. Look for it around Thanksgiving.

End PSA. On with the post!


Today is the end of the first half of NaNoWriMo. Dun-dun-dunnnnn!

Hit the doldrums yet?! I hope not. But if you did, here’s a few more ideas to get you going again:

  • Write from a different/new character viewpoint. New blood = new story.
  • Do something random. Add a flock of menacing ducks. An angry bank teller. Have an alien invasion at the mall. Make all the zombies start getting better. You know… weird stuff.
  • Talk out your story situation with friends or family. Have them give you random ideas for new conflict and then draw one from a hat.

Or maybe this is you: “I missed three days, and am waaaay behind. Help!”

  • Don’t panic.
  • Worry even less about typos.
  • Worry even less about the story making sense – as long as you can keep it going in a good/fun direction.
  • Make sure that you end your writing day in the middle of a scene rather than completing it. That way you know what you are going to write right off the bat next session, and it will be easier to get going.
  • Remove yourself from your normal situations. For example: Use an app that counts words, but isn’t one that you typically use or go outside or to a cafe to write.
  • Set up a reward system. Make it good. What are your favorite little things in life? Do that for yourself.
  • A couple of cheapies, but goodies: stretch descriptions and conversations. Make characters wax eloquent about otherwise boring details in a fun way. Describe every hair on the back of the murderous cat that is the villain of your sci-fi, alternate history.

Whatever you have to do to get that word count! And that brings up the question: what are YOU doing to keep yourself going? Share in the comments! You might help someone achieve their NaNo goal today.

Keep going, everybody! You can do it! Have a blast.

I’ll try to post sooner rather than later, but I’ll not make any specific promises. And please send me some more work! 🙂

4 Reasons To Do NaNoWriMo: Professionals

You’re already a professional writer/author with many worshipful fans. You fly first class… every once in a while. Your new iPhone 5s is gold for crying out loud! Why should you bother with NaNoWriMo?

Here are four reasons that you might:

  1. Get that novella or novelette done. You’ve been putting it off, but no more. If you can, set aside November to bang it out NaNo style. Then you can go get your Hugo or Man Booker prize. Maybe a Nobel. (Probably not.)
  2. Free-write a new concept or world that you have big plans for long term. NaNo can be the lab you need for nearly consequence-free experimentation. Just like in college.
  3. Try out something wacky or something that’s not your usual style. Usually write romance? Maybe give a techno-thriller a whirl. Been toiling away on an urban fantasy series? How about some Law & Order fan fiction? No judgement. We all need a break.
  4. Marketing. Tell your legions of adoring fans what you’re up to. Blog about it. Tell them about your trials & tribulations, as well as your triumphs. It’ll be great for them to see another side of you. Unless that side is kind of a jerk. Then maybe refrain.

What other reasons might you devote your valuable time to NaNoWriMo? Let us know in the comments!

4 Reasons To Try NaNoWriMo: Amateurs

“I’m not a writer.”

You and many others like you said it, but I don’t believe you or them! Here are four reasons you should try NaNoWriMo:

  1. If you’ve ever said to yourself: “Hey… wouldn’t this be kinda cool to see in a movie or story?” Of course you have. This is your chance to finally create that show-stopping scene involving dolphin ninjas, their alien abductors, and the original Broadway cast of Les Mis.
  2. A new challenge for you and your friends. Make it social. Throw some writing parties. Talk trash. (Your character’s mama is so stupid…) It’s more fun with other people. (Sign up for NaNo at their website! There are forums and local writing groups for fun and moral support.)
  3. To find the story lurking in your heart and brain and guts. They say that we all have one good novel in us. I say we all have more than one… but you have to have a good reason to get that first one out. With NaNo, you can. No muss, no fuss.
  4. So you can say: I am a novelist. Maybe you won’t get published or self-publish, but you did it. You wrote a book. And isn’t that freakin’ cool?! Yes. Yes it is.

What other reasons do you have for writing your book? Let us know in the comments… and happy writing!

Link

As writers, we’re always looking for something, some system to not only increase our productivity, but also increase the quality of said production. There are tons of ideas about this floating around on the web, from the micro-level minutiae of Getting Things Done-type systems to the time-based systems like the Pomodoro Technique.

But maybe the answer is in biology!

Check out the link below. As a former professional French hornist, I can attest that this kind of productivity rhythm works. What works for you? Shoot me a link in the comments!

Why You Need To Unplug Every 90 Minutes | Fast Company | Business + Innovation.

5 Random Writing Rules You Can Often Ignore

It has been said – by me, incidentally – that the road to hell is paved with writing rules. Too much adherence to the many rules that are out there can cause paralysis of action in your daily routine, stilted prose… or even the dreaded writer’s block. But writing rules are interesting, and there is truth in nearly all of them.

I was looking around for a compilation of various author’s writing rules and ran across this article in the Guardian from a few years back. I think I remember reading it the first time. Then, as now, I’m struck by both the consistency and the contradictions. Read through to see what I mean. With so many rules, they can’t all be right, right? Here are 5 writing rules (not all of them from the article, lest you think I’m senile) that I think can be ignored or modified:

1. Never start a book in the middle of a fight scene

This definitely depends on the book genre, but the conventional wisdom on this is that you can’t care about a character you don’t know yet, so a fight scene is emotionally meaningless. I think that this is an odd idea. The fact that the author is showing me a (probably main) character in danger from the beginning makes me care more. And you can make your opening fight scene heavy with incongruous character self-reflection or pithy banter that can give the reader important information they need in order to get to know that character quickly.

2. Avoid prologues

If you’re writing epic fantasy, this rule is right out. A thriller or romance probably doesn’t need it, but a prologue is too good of an opportunity to establish an epic feeling or introduce history to your story before debuting the main character(s). Brandon Sanderson confessed to sneaking in three prologues in his Stormlight Archive series opener, The Way of Kings. There is a Prelude, which serves as the prologue to the entire series, the Prologue of the book, and Chapter 1, another prologue-esque section. And you know what? The book doesn’t suffer for it. Robert Jordan became increasingly notorious for his lengthy prologues in the Wheel of Time series. So don’t worry about it in Fantasy. Fans of the genre almost expect it.

3. Write only when you have something to say

This depends on what is meant by ‘something to say.’ If you have a philosophical idea that you want to get across, well you better have an engaging story to use as a vehicle.  If you have no story, then your fiction is going to be a non-starter. But how many great stories or novels have come out of free-writing exercises? Was there a plan there from the outset? If there was, it was probably extremely thin.

4. Stop reading fiction, read non-fiction instead

Ridiculous. If this rule (which is in the Guardian article) was less crazy, I would have ignored it. But, come on… Fiction writers want to write fiction because they enjoyed reading it so much. Why stop? And besides, it’s important to keep up with the trends and styles in your genre and make sure that you aren’t rehashing something that some other author has already covered in the same way you’re planning. This isn’t to say that you shouldn’t read non-fiction. By all means, be as omnivorous as possible in your reading, so long as it’s quality.

5. Eradicate all adverbs

This will be the most controversial of my stances, I’m sure. But adverbs, within reason, are fine. It’s true that most adverbs shift emphasis away from good action verbs, so certainly don’t use them in speech attributions like in a Tom Swifty: “I don’t remember which groceries to get,” Tom said listlessly. Adverbs are a quick way to make prose seem more poetic, but don’t  fall into that trap overuse them. And that’s the key: never to excess. Look… adverbs happen. Even the great adverb abolition crusader Stephen King occasionally drops one on us. And he pointed out in his glowing review of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, that Rowling’s use of adverbs was “endearing rather than annoying.”

Writing rules aren’t bad things, but watch out for them so that your writing doesn’t get wooden. You’re better off taking a few to heart, then adding your own rules as you gain experience. Or you could follow Neil Gaiman’s ‘rules’ and be just fine.

What are some writing rules that irritate you? Let me know in the comments!

Link

Stephen King talks about opening sentences and how hard he works on them over at the Atlantic online. It’s fascinating and worth a read.

I agree that opening lines are important. But what about other ‘opening lines’ in writing? The first lines about a key character or place might need to be as impactful. Unless you’re trying to slide someone or something in as foreshadowing. I’ll have to flesh out my thoughts on this. What other aspects of writing do you think deserve the attention that King gives his openers?