Post NaNoWriMo Editing Sale!

Please note: this sale has ended!


Hello to all you NaNoWriMo participants and winners! I hope that you achieved your goal for the month… whether that was to churn out 50,000 words of Nobel Laureate-worthy prose or just to get back in the swing of creative writing. Me? I didn’t get the word count, but I did get some work done on my work-in-progress, so go me!

Now that we’re all done celebrating our writerly prowess and awake again after our turkey comas, it’s time to… keep writing more! And making sure it’s the best it can be.

I promised a sale on editing services in honor of NaNo (you don’t have to be a winner), so here it is: 25% off of ALL services, big and small. Check my rates here. For work that I don’t charge a per-word rate for, we’ll go through a friendly negotiation and then take 25% off of that.

That’s not all. If you want to sample my services and see what it’s like to work with me in the easiest way, I’ve got deal the for you. Send me up to 5,000 words, and I’ll give it an edit and brief commentary for $35 flat. Simple! (In case you were wondering, that’s $0.007/word!)

“You’re crazy!!” you are probably saying. Nope. Just excited to see what everyone is working on. So contact me today so we can start talking about making your masterpiece even better. It’s going to be fun.

(Offer ends January 31, 2014. Resolve to take advantage of this deal before it’s gone! (See what I did there?!) And again – you don’t have to have had anything to do with NaNoWriMo this year to take advantage of this offer.)

NaNoWriMo: Halfway home. Stuck yet??

Hi, everybody! Sorry I dropped off the map. Between NaNo and the nice little boost of editing and non-profit work you’ve been sending my way (many thanks to you all!), I’ve been busy. I suppose that as soon as I committed to NaNo and started running the sale on non-profit consulting, that work would ensue… but I have room for more! Please contact me today to get some great deals on editing. I am super-fun to work with, if I do say so myself. And as I recall, I promised you all a NaNo editing special. That’s still coming, I just needed to put it off a bit. Look for it around Thanksgiving.

End PSA. On with the post!


Today is the end of the first half of NaNoWriMo. Dun-dun-dunnnnn!

Hit the doldrums yet?! I hope not. But if you did, here’s a few more ideas to get you going again:

  • Write from a different/new character viewpoint. New blood = new story.
  • Do something random. Add a flock of menacing ducks. An angry bank teller. Have an alien invasion at the mall. Make all the zombies start getting better. You know… weird stuff.
  • Talk out your story situation with friends or family. Have them give you random ideas for new conflict and then draw one from a hat.

Or maybe this is you: “I missed three days, and am waaaay behind. Help!”

  • Don’t panic.
  • Worry even less about typos.
  • Worry even less about the story making sense – as long as you can keep it going in a good/fun direction.
  • Make sure that you end your writing day in the middle of a scene rather than completing it. That way you know what you are going to write right off the bat next session, and it will be easier to get going.
  • Remove yourself from your normal situations. For example: Use an app that counts words, but isn’t one that you typically use or go outside or to a cafe to write.
  • Set up a reward system. Make it good. What are your favorite little things in life? Do that for yourself.
  • A couple of cheapies, but goodies: stretch descriptions and conversations. Make characters wax eloquent about otherwise boring details in a fun way. Describe every hair on the back of the murderous cat that is the villain of your sci-fi, alternate history.

Whatever you have to do to get that word count! And that brings up the question: what are YOU doing to keep yourself going? Share in the comments! You might help someone achieve their NaNo goal today.

Keep going, everybody! You can do it! Have a blast.

I’ll try to post sooner rather than later, but I’ll not make any specific promises. And please send me some more work! 🙂

NaNoWriMo Tools – Part 5: Three Reasons I Write to Music

Not every writer likes to write to music, but many do. I am one of those.

Here are 3 reasons that I rock out to get my word count.

  1. Concentration. Music sort of walls in my head and helps keep aural distractions to a minimum. And that is something that really, really helps for NaNoWriMo – especially if you haven’t hit your daily word count goal for the day. Also, I never would have been able to do NaNo on a busy, noisy train without good headphones and loud music.
  2. Create different moods for different scenes. I have different playlists set up for different emotions. Need angry or determined? Cue up some raucous, kick-butt movie music. Contemplative? Chill electronic or trance. Romance? A playlist of 1970s movie love themes. It works. No, really, it does.
  3. Motivation. Sometimes it’s hard to get going, so I put on some music and wait for the muse to show. She generally comes riding in on the wings of heroic movie soundtracks.

Type of music is definitely important to me. Here are 3 of my favorite music types for writing.

  1. Instrumental Soundtracks. So many moods… and almost no words to get in your brain. Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, Hanna, Conan the Barbarian (the Schwarzenegger version of course), and How to Train Your Dragon are among my favorites.
  2. Electronic and New Age. Two different types of energy and again… no words. For electronic, I just put on Spotify or iTunes radio and go. For New Age… can’t go wrong with Mannheim Steamroller’s Fresh Air series.
  3. The music of the 1980s. Yes they have words, but I know all these songs from my childhood so well, that I don’t ‘hear’ the words any more. Lots of pep really gives me forward momentum. Your milage may vary.

(Why no classical? I can listen to some classical, but I find it extremely distracting since I have two degrees in French horn performance. All of my music theory classes kick in, and I’m down the rabbit hole of analysis!)

Please share you favorite writing music in the comments!

And that does it for my NaNoWriMo Tools series! Hope you enjoyed it. If you missed the other installments, see Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4.

NaNoWriMo Tools – Part 2: Focus Tools

NaNoWriMo is super fun. But it’s not always easy to get through the month. There are so many reasons to abandon the enterprise: work, kids, football, video games, government shutdowns… the list goes on and on.

But don’t give in! You can fight through the distractions… even the dreaded, yet sweetly seductive siren song of the internet. No really: you can avoid Facebook for 1700 words worth.

Yes, you can.

Stop shaking your head! I’m telling you…

Okay, look: here are some tools and methods to hold distraction at bay and become a NaNo winner!

Distraction-bashing Word Processors

The makers of OmmWriter say on their website that:

OmmWriter is here to serve you. Re-connect with your old friends Concentration and Creativity, and discover the bliss of single-tasking.

That’s exactly what you need to succeed at NaNoWriMo. And OmmWriter provides a serene, beautiful container in which to create. It features a simple full-screen text editor, soothing visual backgrounds, enveloping musical soundscapes, and keystroke sounds that will make you want to press on. It only does plain text, so you don’t even have the distraction of bold and italics.And it counts words. I go to this when I really need to bear down. Then I copy/paste back into Scrivener.

If that kind of visual and aural situation is not for you, try Hog Bay Software’s WriteRoom. Same full-screen editing capabilities, in a much simpler form both from a sight and sound standpoint. You can change the screen and font color to create your own themes, which can be shared.

For more ideas for distraction writing software check out this article over at the American Genius.

Ways to Avoid the Internet

This is hard. Really hard. Sometimes you have to go with drastic measures.

Freedom. This is what we want: freedom from the temptation of the internet. Turn it on, set the timer, and it cuts off your network. The only way to subvert the app is to reboot. Not insurmountable, obviously, but will make you think hard.

SelfControl is another internet blocker to try.

Or you could try actual self control to avoid checking Twitter and your newsfeeds. If you find a way to do that, bay all means, let me know!

Pick Where You Work Carefully

The internet is not the only distraction. Your phone, family, friends, dogs, and work will all clamor for your NaNo time. Don’t let them divert you! Make sure that you choose a place to work that allows you to avoid all this. Is it a closet in your house? How about the local bar or café? The park? (I’ll post about methods of going portable soon.) Make sure that you try different places and setups until you find the one that you’re most productive in. But don’t be afraid to switch things up if you need too! The only thing that matters is the word count!

What are you going to do to make sure that distractions don’t crush your dreams of calling yourself a novelist? Let us know in the comments!

Next up: NaNoWriMo Writing Tools to Get You Organized

After that: NaNoWriMo Writing Tools to Help You Go Portable

Starting later this month (October 2013), I’ll be running a sale on all editing services! And at the end of November, look for another special offer for NaNo winners… both past and present.

NaNoWriMo Tools – Part 1: Word Processors

I am looking forward to bringing you my NaNoWriMo Tools series. I like tech and clever software, and trying out new toys is a singular joy. Writers need toys too, especially for NaNo. The first thing you need? A word processor that counts words so you know how far along you are at all times, both for each day and overall. There are a bunch of those out there, but some are better than others… especially for NaNoWriMo. (Oh… and I’m a Mac guy, so that will be the emphasis. PC people: please share your favorite word processors in the comments!)

Word

Ah, the old reliable. This works perfectly well: it arranges words, formats them, counts them, is super-familiar and dependable. If you go this route, I’d use one file a day for easy word counting and keep the overall tally in an Excel sheet. (Or keep the tally on a poster you can put the wall of your office. Motivational.) You could also use OpenOffice to the same effect.

Text Edit/TextWrangler/Notepad

If you’d like something simpler – much more stripped down – these aren’t bad options. Sometimes simpler is better (as you’ll see in another entry in the NaNo ‘Tools’ series). Text Edit on Mac and Notepad on Windows are plaintext and rich text editors. TextWrangler is that as well, but also can handle working with HTML. That’s for if you want your NaNo novel to be a multi-media web-stravaganza. And who doesn’t want that??

Google Docs (now Google Drive)

Edit anytime, anywhere, from practically any device. Your NaNo novel in the cloud! As long as you have an internet connection (or figure out how to make offline mode work reliably), you should be good to go. It counts words, and you can keep your overall tally in Google’s Excel equivalent.

Scrivener

This is my tool of choice. I’ve been using it for almost as long as it’s been around. Not only does it handle text amazingly well, it also counts words in well-implemented ways. Keith and co. over at Literature and Latte have built in features that really help with NaNo, including the ability to set writing session targets, manuscript targets, alerts, and even the ability to tweet out your progress and taunt your friends with your 5631-word day! And there’s so much more to Scrivener: it outlines (but remember for NaNo, no too much), allows you to move and edit non-consecutive chunks of text easily, keep research notes, and on and on. It even has a built-in name generator, so you don’t have to waste time grasping for one out of thin air. It’s extremely powerful, but works the way you want to work. And it compiles and exports straight to ePub format… or any other format you can think of, as well as some you haven’t, I’d imagine!

What word processor do you use and why? Let us know in the comments!

Next up: NaNoWriMo Writing Tools to Help You Focus

After that: NaNoWriMo Writing Tools to Get You Organized

NaNoWriMo: To Prep or Not to Prep? That’s a Darn Good Question.

Unless you’re an experienced author or NaNoWriMo veteran, I don’t recommend much in the way of outlining or other deep prep. NaNo works far better if you employ ‘discovery writing,’ that is: make it up as you go with as little to go on as possible, as opposed to planning thoroughly. (Gardener vs. Architect.) This is a fun way to write, as it is more like the reading experience: lots of surprises. It’s a blast when your characters start doing unexpected things!

But… a little prep can go a long way towards making sure you stay on track, and don’t get discouraged.

Experienced writers can do more prep if they like, but I do recommend that inexperienced folks keep it to the minimum. Still, it’s not a good idea to start from complete ignorance. Before November 1, make sure you know at least something about the following:

  • Genre – Deciding whether you’re doing an action-adventure or post-apocalyptic dystopia brings in a whole host of standard assumptions that you can rely on to help guide the story.
  • Setting – A ‘where’ and what that ‘where’ is like is super-helpful.
  • Basic Plot – Hero’s journey? Love triangle… or pentagram? Decide in general terms what will drive the conflict in your story.
  • Protagonist and antagonist – Who does the story revolve around? What are they like at the beginning? Where do think you’d like them to go? What are their primary internal conflicts? (David Farland on Characters (short but mightily helpful))
  • The End – Not everything, but something about the end, even just an inking of an idea can help keep you going when you get to the doldrums of NaNo (and it will happen!).

One more important thing to keep in mind: When you do get to the doldrums and your story stagnates, be ready to introduce conflict to keep your plot moving forward and your characters jumping!

Have fun getting ready for NaNo! Let me know in the comments how you’re going to prepare – or if you’re a vet, how you’ve prepared in the past.