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The business side of writing is what comes after you’ve crafted your masterpiece. If you’re not keeping up with publishing trends in our fast-changing industry, you’re going to be way behind the eight ball. Check out contract lawyer David Vandagriff’s blog, The Passive Voice. This blog of publishing industry legal and business news is indispensable due not only to its aggregation of the top publishing industry news, but his insightful commentary on said news. Check out today’s post on HBO getting all excited about airing the most pirated show on TV: The Game of Thrones, then add The Passive Voice to your RSS feeds.

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If you’re a writer – especially one that’s just starting out – and you’re not reading David Farland’s writing tips at his website, or subscribing to his daily email, start now. Dave has a ton of experience as an author and creative writing teacher and is more than willing to share that experience with us. He posted something inspirational recently that I really liked  because it reminds us that there’s more than one way to work towards our writing goals. Money quote:

“If you want to be a writer, think about the time that you first felt that passion. Let it grow in you a little today. Take the steps that you need to in order to grow. If that means that you must sit down and type, then hit the keyboards. If you need to plot a story, get started on it. If you feel like you need to take a class or read a book on writing, do it. If all that you do is study the work of another fine writer by reading a chapter or two before bed, your time will be well spent.

Nurture your passions. Light up the night.”

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Stephen King talks about opening sentences and how hard he works on them over at the Atlantic online. It’s fascinating and worth a read.

I agree that opening lines are important. But what about other ‘opening lines’ in writing? The first lines about a key character or place might need to be as impactful. Unless you’re trying to slide someone or something in as foreshadowing. I’ll have to flesh out my thoughts on this. What other aspects of writing do you think deserve the attention that King gives his openers?